Johnson Hall Fountain Raid

This year, the over forty year tradition of Hall Raids was changed. Instead of students running through dorms in the middle of the night banging pans and yelling, the tradition was moved to the Johnson Fountain. Why did this change happen and how do students feel about it?


The tradition was changed to be more accommodating to students as it caused distress to people with sleep issues, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, Emotional Support Animals, anxiety, sensory issues, and other related disorders. Many people have expressed the negative effects of this tradition over the years and Meredith College listened, canceling the tradition hall raid and changing it to a less upsetting activity.


Students gathered Thursday November 3rd at 4:30 p.m. at the Johnson Fountain and banged their pans and hollered in a safe environment that did not disturb sleeping students.


Michaela Altman, Class of 2024 Cornhuskin' co-chair, said that she “enjoyed being able to go outside with [their] pots and pans, but it felt a little off doing it in the middle of the day.” Altman suggested “making the fountain raid later at night” as “many students… wanted to come but were not able to because the fountain raid started at 4:30.”


As a Junior, Altman experienced an actual Hall Raid last year and said it “is a really sweet and fun memory for our class, and believes it's one of many events that really embody the liveliness of Cornhuskin' season.” While she stated that she “completely understand[s] removing [Hall Raids] for the purposes of preventing any complications for those with PTSD, anxiety, etc.”


As an alternative, they suggested that “it could be fun to do a raid around campus… we could follow a pathway around campus, bring our pots and pans, take pictures and videos, etc.”


Perhaps continuing in the future, Meredith College will develop this new tradition to be more enjoyable for people who want to participate without causing major disruption to people who do not.


By Riley Heeb, Reporter

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