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To Sell or Not to Sell? The Ethics of Selling Graduation Tickets


Photo courtesy of Clker-Free-Vector-Images from Pixabay

Graduation is not only an exciting time, but it is also a busy and even possibly an expensive time for some. There is indeed a lot going on, but ultimately graduation is a time to celebrate a senior’s four year chapter coming to an end and the start of a new chapter of their lives.


The big day is one meant to be celebrated with their loved ones and fellow classmates. Each Meredith student gets six tickets l to invite said loved ones, and any more than that would depend on tickets remaining or if a fellow classmate were to share any tickets they were not using. Some of these students give their tickets away, while others may decide to sell them.


At the end of the day, I believe you have to do what works for you. As an International student myself, I certainly will not be using all six of my tickets and would probably share them for free with any friends or anyone looking to use them. However, I can certainly appreciate, acknowledge and respect the grind. As mentioned above, it is an expensive time for Seniors. Off the top of my head, the expenses include graduation gowns, graduation outfits, photographers and much more. Making quick, easy money that can contribute towards it seems like a viable solution, especially if there is a market for it. If people are selling and it is still a well known concept, it clearly has been working. Sure, we could talk about the ethics of it, but ultimately, if you do not want to pay for tickets, there must be other options available somewhere.


To play the devil’s advocate a little bit, it ultimately boils down to the ethics at the crux of it all. While everybody has the right and freedom to choose what to do with their tickets, you must also evaluate the effects it will have on your fellow classmates and the fairness of it all when your graduation day arrives. Graduation is a momentous occasion and no one should have to miss out on celebrating the occasion with everyone they want to simply because purchasing tickets is not a viable option. I have no insight as to what the average ticket would sell for, but it seems ethical if everyone were to have equal opportunities for how to get the tickets. Even a $15 ticket, which may seem reasonable, could be out of someone’s budget or price range. Essentially, by giving these tickets up for free, it is benefitting those receiving the tickets and should not negatively impact those giving them away because they do not lose anything in the process. At least this way, the tickets will not go to waste and it is a kind gesture to check off the list.


Perhaps the best solution would be requesting the number of tickets each senior needs, within a reasonable limit.. In doing so, it absolves anyone of having to search for someone to get tickets from, and it doesn’t put anyone in the complicated position of choosing between personal profit or giving the tickets away. This would most likely add a layer of complexity for the college and how to distribute the graduation tickets. However, at least it would be creating a level playing field that would hopefully alleviate some of the stresses and obligations that comes with the day itself.


I am still a decent time away from graduating and so there is yet time to figure out the best and most equitable way of distributing tickets among seniors. As of now, the current system seems to be functioning relatively well. Continue to respect the efforts made for selling tickets, but take the time to think of all the options available. Everyone is in a different boat but sailing in the same direction; let's find a way to make sure everyone can get to the destination and celebrate that accomplishment with everyone they want surrounding them.


By Shae-Lynn Henderson, Features Editor

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